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Tuesday, February 16, 2010

Applying For Dual Citizenship in Italy

Filename: j0444594.jpgApplying for Dual Citizenship in Italy

If you have been reading my blog, you will know that I am in hot pursuit of American/Italian dual citizenship. With the month of May quickly approaching, it will soon be one year since having begun the search. Even if you may not be a candidate for dual citizenship, it is strongly believed that simply collecting the documents is a great learning experience. So much information has been learned about my family, much of which would have never been know if this endeavor had not been started. 

From browsing the Internet, I read a forum entry about applying within Italy. I knew that it could be done, but very few people had actually gone through with it. The entry had been submitted by a member on ExpatForum.com, and consists of information about the process. Each day, the candidate updated the forum on his experience, listing offices that one would need to visit and the documents required to apply, as well as the ever looming red tape. I’ve written down the key information based on his postings to apply in Italy.
First, I would highly recommend making an appointment with your nearest consulate to make sure you have all the necessary paperwork you will need. Additional information may be needed by them, so it is probably best to collect everything while you are still in the States. In order to begin your process in Italy, you MUST have your passport stamped with an Entry stamp upon your arrival. You will be entering first on a tourist visa. The tourist visa is simply the stamp received in Customs, and it lasts for three months. You must also fill out a kit which can be given to you at the post office.
Next, on the day you so choose, bring all your documents and a copy of the Circolare 32/2007 to the nearest anagrafe. (There may be a more updated version of the Circolare. From what I remember from the posting, more current papers of this document were provided to the applicant.) At the anagrafe you will be applying for residency status. State that you will be residing for the purpose of ‘recognition of Italian citizenship by decent. To continue the process, you will need a codice fiscale, which can be compared to the American equivalent of a Social Security number. In order to receive your codice fiscal, you must provide either your passport or PDSpermesso di soggiorno.
The third step is to bring these documents to the Ufficio delle Entrate. Once you have received your residency status, your documents are now ready to be submitted. Residency status will be acquired after the vigili have inspected your residence, and a letter from the comune has been received. The letter from the anagrafe should take two to three weeks. Submit your documents and wait for the sindaco to approve them.
Note: From my readings, many posters have mentioned that they at times had difficulties with those who worked in each office. This was because many of them do not seem to understand the entire process, and who does what in the different branches.

If you have applied in Italy, and have been successful, please share your experience with us! Simply post it in the blog’s comment section. You can also e-mail me your experience at PassagetoItaly@gmail.com!

2 comments:

  1. Put me in the "Those that started, but gave up" column. And I have been married to an Italian for 24 year, and both of my kids are dual. I get truly depressed very time we go through customs in Europe and I have to stand in the "I don't have a burgundy passport' line ;-)

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  2. Wow, you're married to an Italian, but still don't have dual citizenship? How is that possible? I heard that it takes at least three years in order for the application to be processed. My guess is that, if you're married in America, apply for dual before the consulate, it takes three years for them to recognize it as an 'official' marriage. Care to share your story battling against Italian bureaucracy and red tape?! :-D

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